Volcano danger for Guatemala

Guatemala warns of volcano danger

(CNN) -- Authorities in Guatemala say they've detected an increase in vibration inside a volcano that killed three people when it erupted in May.
Researchers recently detected "an increase in internal vibration" at the Pacaya volcano, about 18 miles (30 kilometers) south of Guatemala City. The increase could cause further eruptions, according to a statement from CONRED, an emergency agency of the Guatemalan government.
Seismologists have not ruled out a complete eruption that could, depending on the wind direction, bring ash and soot to the capital.
An eruption of the volcano in May killed three people and shut down the international airport in Guatemala City.

By the CNN Wire Staff
cnnAuthor = "By the CNN Wire Staff";

Mayan Tomb Found in Guatemala

Mayan King's Tomb Discovered in Guatemala

ScienceDaily (July 17, 2010) — A well-preserved tomb of an ancient Mayan king has been discovered in Guatemala by a team of archaeologists led by Brown University's Stephen Houston. The tomb is packed with carvings, ceramics, textiles, and the bones of six children, who may have been sacrificed at the time of the king's death.

The team uncovered the tomb, which dates from about 350 to 400 A.D., beneath the El Diablo pyramid in the city of El Zotz in May. The news was made public July 15 during a press conference in Guatemala City, hosted by the Ministry of Culture and Sports, which authorized the work.
Before making the actual discovery, Houston said the team thought "something odd" was happening in the deposit they were digging. They knew a small temple had been built in front of a sprawling structure dedicated to the sun god, an emblem of Maya rulership. "When we sunk a pit into the small chamber of the temple, we hit almost immediately a series of 'caches' -- blood-red bowls containing human fingers and teeth, all wrapped in some kind of organic substance that left an impression in the plaster. We then dug through layer after layer of flat stones, alternating with mud, which probably is what kept the tomb so intact and airtight."